Motivate 'Children' to do well in school!
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No welfare with bad grades - What the Hell

What the Hell! Cut welfare assistance to families who‘s children fail a grade???

Look, I am no fan of the welfare system or the many social programs that were intended to help people in real need but have been converted into systems that drive people to be dependent on the government. Yes, I said it and I can. Why? Because I grew up in the system – that’s why!

This is a perfect example of what I mean.

welfare yuthink for grades"Some lawmakers in Tennessee think they have the answer to helping poor students who are struggling in school: Reduce welfare payments to their families."

Families' welfare could get cut if kids flunk
Article by: Aimee Picchi

So you mean to tell me that the answer to getting better grades is to cut funding from the very people government says is so desperately in need of help – that they have to raise taxes on the rich because poor people are struggling. So even though they need this "assistance" badly – let’s play with their money and cut their funds in order to control them – I mean motivate them to have better grades.

Who the hell comes up with these stupid Ideas?

Let me get this off my chest first; motivating children to learn, to strive for more, a better life requires two things: 1. a parent that is willing to instill this into their Childs mind 2. The child must want to, must desire on its own to seek a better life and to understand that knowledge (learning) is important in every stage of life. Without these two things it can’t be done. I have read of how children in impoverished communities and struggling poor parents have become successful and even millionaires - not because of some hand out, but because they desired to achieve more.

Yet here comes the government who spent the last election cycle saying things like – the government should do more to protect its citizens, especially those who have been treated unfairly.

So tell me what is your plan? Oh, to take money out of the hands of poor needy families in hopes of forcing them to do what we think is right. No really, that is what the answer is, that is what one senator said basically.

"It’s really just something to try to get parents involved with their kids," Sen. Stacey Campfield, who sponsored the legislation, told the Tennessean newspaper. "We have to do something."

welfare grades taxesAgain, the answer is to take money away you say they desperately need in order for them to do what you want them to. Hmmm, sounds a lot like control to me? But hey, forget about teaching children to strive for perfection, to dream and to put forth effort, sacrifice – you know, that thing we call work. Success is not measure by how much you have, but by how much you overcome – but not in our society. We have resigned ourselves to getting people hooked on everything from welfare, google, to cell phones and what not because we have to have it easy – no one should struggle and suffer. But then when they, the people rely on the system, the system starts to try and control them.

For good or for bad – control to me means a lack of freedom.

The saying goes:
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach him how to fish and he will never go hungry."

And here is the kicker my friends: the government wants you to do better – right. Let’s cut their funding to encourage poor parents to be involved in their Childs education and future. So what do they do?

They give them an out.

Campbell wrote on his blog on Tuesday that parents would have an "out" if they enroll the kids in tutoring, which he says is "free in every school I know of," or if they set up a tutoring program. Parents could also enroll themselves in a parenting course or attend multiple parent-teacher conferences to get their kids on track.

Tutoring means I don’t have to get involved; tutoring is free – paid by whom? So in reality – our wonderful government has done nothing new: but make wonderful speeches to make them-selves look good. Yeah – thanks for nothing.

This is why I wrote my book, this is why I believe we need to instill in our people, our children that yes they need help – but they can do this with or without you (government). Take interest in learning, self-improving, striving for more. You can be successful – try it, you have nothing to lose.


Here is a full copy of article since – they tend to disappear with time on this website.

Families' welfare could get cut if kids flunk

A Tennessee bill would reduce payments by up to a third if their children fail a grade. Would that help or harm?

By Aimee Picchi Fri 10:59 AM

Some lawmakers in Tennessee think they have the answer to helping poor students who are struggling in school: Reduce welfare payments to their families.

How would it work? If a poor kid fails a grade, that family's welfare benefits could be cut by up to 30%. The theory is that the threat of less money would prompt the parents to pay attention to their child's learning and education.

"It’s really just something to try to get parents involved with their kids," Sen. Stacey Campfield, who sponsored the legislation, told the Tennessean newspaper. "We have to do something."

An amended version of the bill -- which added tweaks such as limiting maximum penalties to parents who don't attend parent-teacher conferences -- passed a state Senate committee earlier this week, according to the publication. Special-needs students would be exempt.

Research supports Campfield's premise that parental involvement will close the learning gap between the haves and have-nots. A 2007 Harvard Family Research Project study found that parental involvement for children in low-income families made a big difference in achievement.

But it remains to be seen if the threat of lower welfare payments could spur impoverished parents to action -- or even if teachers would fail those students, if they knew that could mean even more troubles at home.

One thing is certain: Low-income students are at a huge disadvantage when compared with kids from wealthier families. Poor children often grow up with a "word gap," meaning they hear fewer spoken words from adults each day than do children from middle- or high-income homes.

"In fact, by the time a child growing up in a low-income household reaches their fourth birthday, they will have heard 30 million fewer words than their peers in middle- and high-income households," according to the Mayors Challenge from Bloomberg Philanthropies.

The charitable organization earlier this month awarded $5 million to Providence, R.I., for a program that seeks to close the word gap with young children.

Tennessee's push comes as the state grapples with a rise in the number of families receiving welfare. According to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, welfare recipients in Tennessee have jumped 14% since 2007, when the recession started.

Campbell wrote on his blog on Tuesday that parents would have an "out" if they enroll the kids in tutoring, which he says is "free in every school I know of," or if they set up a tutoring program. Parents could also enroll themselves in a parenting course or attend multiple parent-teacher conferences to get their kids on track.

He added, "If passed this could be a great step in ending generational poverty caused by lack of education."


http://money.msn.com/now/post.aspx?post=6848a068-50e7-4d64-8ebc-c34d713d235f



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